Health Canada eases restrictions on abortion pill Mifegymiso

Health Canada eases restrictions on abortion pill Mifegymiso

Ottawa is making it easier for women to get the abortion pill, relaxing rules around who can prescribe the drug and at what stage of pregnancy a woman can take it – changes that catapult Canada among the world's most liberal jurisdictions in terms of obtaining the medication.

Health Canada approves abortion pill use up to nine weeks

Health Canada approves abortion pill use up to nine weeks

Health Canada updated its product monograph for Mifegymiso, the two-drug combination of pills that doctors can prescribe to women who want a medical abortion. The current monograph, approved in July 2015 after years of delays, states that Mifegymiso is safe for use up to seven weeks into a pregnancy — even though most countries that have legalized the abortion pill use a 10-week limit.

Doctors' confusion and red tape keeping women from abortion pill, Planned Parenthood says

Doctors' confusion and red tape keeping women from abortion pill, Planned Parenthood says

Conflicting guidelines and onerous after-care requirements are barring “a huge amount” of women from accessing the abortion pill, say staff at Planned Parenthood Ottawa, as doctors try to wrap their heads around the logistical hurdles. 

Increased Mifegymiso coverage is progress for abortion access in Canada

Increased Mifegymiso coverage is progress for abortion access in Canada

The easing of various Health Canada requirements is welcome news. Of course, more work needs to be done to increase the pool of providers and ensure universal coverage, but positive progress continues and we hope to see a surge in availability throughout Canada. 

Provinces take patchwork approach to funding for abortion pill Mifegymiso

Provinces take patchwork approach to funding for abortion pill Mifegymiso

Almost eight months after the abortion pill became available in Canada, three provinces have yet to decide whether to fund the medication, while three others have opted to provide only limited coverage, primarily for low-income women, according to a Globe and Mail survey.